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My top 5 favorite John Hughes movie music moments

August 7, 2009
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By Shannon

So, I know that everyone  on the interweb is going to have their favorite John Hughes lists including movies, moments, and characters.  I started going over my favorites in my head tonight, and every scene I came up with was accompanied by a soundtrack snippet.  I realized that not only did John Hughes influence my taste in movies, but damn if he didn’t turn me on to some fine tunes in the process. Let’s face it, the man was a master at picking out the songs.  He put together some of the most memorable soundtracks of all time. Therefore, and so, I present my top 5 John Hughes movie music moments.  Before you get your panties in a wad (or have them confiscated by Anthony Michael Hall’s geek from Sixteen Candles), remember, these are personal.

“This Woman’s Work”  Kate Bush.  From  She’s having a baby go to the 3:20 mark to hear the song.  This song was my intro to the magnificent Kate Bush. It is stupendously awesome as the backdrop to Kevin Bacon’s mini-breakdown over the very sobering realization that his pregnant wife and unborn child are in tangible danger.  Fun fact:  I used this movie as a litmus test for boys I dated.  If they showed no emotion during this sequence, it was adios, amigos.

“If you leave” OMD, from Pretty in Pink.  Hughes did not direct Pretty in Pink, but he did write it and served as Executive Producer, which makes it fair game.  In my angst-ridden hormone charged teenaged years, this song made me weep all four times I saw the movie in theaters.  How could Andie leave Blaine at the prom, after everything they had been through?  Never fear, the star-crossed lovers meet up in the parking lot and make out to the english pop band’s sweet confection of a song.


Watch OMD – If You Leave (from “Pretty In Pink”) in Music |  View More Free Videos Online at Veoh.com

“Don’t You Forget About Me”  Simple Minds, from The Breakfast Club.  This song played over the ending sequence of the movie, when all the characters who had bonded over the day depart once again for their separate lives.  You know darn well that they will indeed forget one another, and life will go back to normal come Monday.  It’s a fabulous song that introduced Jim Kerr and Simple Minds to the American Mainstream.  I still own the extended 12′ single.

“Holiday Road” by Lindsey Buckingham, from National Lampoon’s Vacation.  You have something seriously wrong with you if you don’t find this jaunty tune from sometime Fleetwood Mac bandmate Lindsey Buckingham utterly infectious.  It should plaster a smile on your face, as it is synonymous with the road movie that was decades ahead of its time.  Hughes wrote the short story the film was based on.

Finally, my favorite.  ”If you were here” The Thompson Twins, from Sixteen Candles.  I turn to mush every time I see this scene.  Sam has just had the crappiest sixteenth birthday of all time, and her sister’s wedding party is finally departing.  Dejected, she turns to go back to her miserable everyday existence.  But wait, what’s that out of the corner of her eye, is it…could it be…why it’s Jake, the man of her dreams, standing in front of his sportscar, sheepishly waiting to whisk her away.  *Sigh*  Still one of the most romantic moments I’ve ever witnessed, and made Michael Schoeffling the fodder of my nocturnal dreams for years to come.  A perfect moment to end on.

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3 Responses to “ My top 5 favorite John Hughes movie music moments ”

  1. anncine on August 7, 2009 at 7:41 am

    Dammit. Now I am all weepy and shit. Powerful memories..

  2. pancake on August 7, 2009 at 7:52 am

    Oh, to be young and feel love’s keen sting. I weep for the teen/romance/happy ending that John Hughes made me believe could happen to me (but of course, never did.)

  3. Sara Henke on August 11, 2009 at 11:37 pm

    Hands down, it has to be the instrumental version of “Please Please Please Let Me Get What I Want” The Smiths from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off when they are going around the Art Institute and looking at the Seurat.

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